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Botanical name

Coriandrum sativum

Plant Care

Size

Categories

Flowers

The plant produces small white or purplish-tinged flowers.

Common name(s)

Coriander

Origin

Foliage

An annual herb with dark green, parsley-like leaves

Uses in landscape design

It can be placed in a large pot on a veranda or patio.

Planting instructions

Sow in a sunny spot. Seed formation in coriander is hindered by proximity to fennel, so don't grow these plants near each other.

Maintenance

Seeds germinate quickly; keep seedlings moist.

Soil conditions

Well dug and richly composted.

Uses

The leaves are used in Indian, Thai, Mediterranean and contemporary cooking. The mature seeds, always called coriander, are ground or crushed and used for flavouring Indian dishes, breads and cakes, and as a component of pickling spice. One of the top five favourite spices in the world!
Coriander can be used to make an insect repelling spray.
Medicinal – Coriander seed can be chewed or drunk in the form of a tea, as a digestive tonic. Coriander essential oil can be added to rheumatic ointments to relieve pain.

Wildlife attractions

Much loved by bees and butterflies.

Interesting planting ideas

Aphids cannot tolerate the smell and the oiliness of the seeds, and this makes coriander an excellent companion for nasturtiums, mealies, dill and tomatoes.

Interesting info

When grown in summer, the plants go to seed within four months. In winter, coriander is usually grown for its leaves which have a distinctive taste.
The ancient Romans combined coriander with cumin seeds and vinegar and used this to preserve meat, fowl and fish. In China during the Han Dynasty, coriander was used as a precious medicine to treat wounds, sores, burns, boils and all sorts of other afflictions.

Possible problems

Seed formation in coriander is hindered by proximity to fennel, so don’t grow these plants near each other.

Harvest

Young leaves can be picked at any time and seeds should be collected when they turn brown, before they drop.

When to sow

Seed sowing instructions

Sow the seed 300mm apart.

The plant produces small white or purplish-tinged flowers.

An annual herb with dark green, parsley-like leaves

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